June 12, 2024

Who's Poor Richard?

Benjamin Franklin, writing under the pseudonym Richard Saunders (AKA "Poor Richard"), published Poor Richard's Almanack from 1732 to 1758. The almanack provided useful information, proverbial wisdom, and humor to the American colonies.ย 

In keeping with Franklin's legacy, Poor Richard's Blog tackles todayโ€™s complex issues and the foundations of the Franklin Party, while hopefully also dispensing some wisdom and good humor along the way.ย ย 

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Poor Richard's Blog

Benjamin Franklin, writing under the pseudonym Richard Saunders (AKA "Poor Richard"), published Poor Richard's Almanack from 1732 to 1758. The almanack provided useful information, proverbial wisdom, and humor to the American colonies.ย 

In keeping with Franklin's legacy, Poor Richard's Blog tackles todayโ€™s complex issues and the foundations of the Franklin Party, while hopefully also dispensing some wisdom and good humor along the way.ย ย 

Welcome to the Franklin Party Newsletter!

Civility

โ€œBe civil to allโ€ โ€“ Benjamin Franklin

In past issues of this blog, weโ€™ve talked about the Benjamin Franklin Partyโ€™s guiding principles of ScienceJustice, and Foresight. Not yet discussed is the requirement and beneficial outcome of these principles: Civility. While civility is not often directly associated with Science, Justice, or Foresight, hereโ€™s why it is intrinsic to each.

Science
Advancing our knowledge of the world through science is a highly collaborative process that requires civility. But scientists still regularly challenge each otherโ€™s work. This questioning is seen as healthy and integral to the scientific method to ensure the highest quality results are achieved. And this vetting is typically handled civilly through peer-reviewed journals.

Justice
If justice is acting fairly toward everyone, and in a manner weโ€™d all like to be treated, then justice involves civility. Within the scope of justice, the Benjamin Franklin Partyโ€™s goal is to create the best possible United States for all Americans, and this means a welcoming and productive environment of civility.

Foresight
Foresight recognizes that the true game of governance is a long one, and has the potential for many twists, turns, advances, and reversals along the way. If we burn relationship bridges now, through short-sighted incivility, then we wonโ€™t have those bridges later should we need to cross them. So the principle of foresight also recommends civility.

As Americaโ€™s founders and crisis presidents, such as Lincoln, have shown, civility can happen at any time, even during periods of war and social strife, when it is perhaps needed most.

And civility can happen anywhere along the political spectrum. No political party or ideology owns civility.

The only thing required for civility is for people to decide to be civil. It is both free, and when utilized, priceless.

For our part, the Franklin Party chooses to follow the sterling example of our namesake, Benjamin Franklin, who was endlessly civil toward all, friend and foe alike.

Science, Justice, Foresight: Civility.

Yours in republic keeping,
James Carroll
BFPNC Chair

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